International

Year in review: global stories from 2014

Author: 
Terry Lavender

The University of Toronto’s impact is global. 

Students and faculty travel throughout the world to study, research and help local communities. They collaborate with colleagues internationally and make discoveries aimed at improving lives both at home and abroad. 

Ancient, hydrogen-rich waters discovered deep underground at locations around the world

Sub-title: 
Finding represents "a quantum change in our understanding" of how much of Earth’s crust may be habitable, says world-renowned researcher
Author: 
Kim Luke

A team of scientists led by the University of Toronto’s Barbara Sherwood Lollar has mapped the location of hydrogen-rich waters found trapped kilometres beneath Earth’s surface in rock fractures in Canada, South Africa and Scandinavia. 

Fighting Ebola in West Africa: alumna Stefanie Carmichael

Sub-title: 
"When I was called to join the Ebola response, I couldn’t say no"
Author: 
Terry Lavender

Reactions to the ongoing Ebola crisis in West Africa have been varied – from cancelled flights to highly-publicized quarantines to heroic efforts by nurses and doctors to treat the afflicted. Many people are trying to help out however they can, including Stefanie Carmichael, a U of T alumna now working for the United Nations.

Meet the winners of Hult Prize at U of T; next stop, regional rounds

Author: 
Terry Lavender

Giving marginalized people the support they need to live a healthy life. 

That’s the goal of Attollo, a social entrepreneurship team composed of Rotman MBA students Aisha Bukhari and Lak Chinta and recent Rotman MBA grad Peter Cinat. They are now one step closer to their goal after winning the Hult Prize at U of T competition on December 6. Attollo beat out 14 other U of T teams, earning a spot in the Hult regional rounds in March 2015. 

Stem cell pioneer's major multinational discovery may speed research

Sub-title: 
Five articles published simultaneously by Professor Andras Nagy and scientists from four continents

There's a new class of stem cell that's exciting researchers around the world – and it was discovered by an international  team of almost 50 scientists on four continents, led by U of T researchers.

Recruiters rank U of T grads first in employability for Canada, 13th in world

Author: 
Terry Lavender

The University of Toronto came out tops in Canada for graduate employability for the third straight year in the annual Global Employability University Survey and Ranking.

And that’s good news for U of T grads, since employability – the working skills of graduating students – is the number one criterion that employment recruiters look at when hiring, according to the survey results.

Welcome to Antarctica: counting down to the launch of SPIDER

Nineteen researchers from seven universities are in Antarctica assembling SPIDER – an experiment consisting of six telescopes that will be attached to a helium balloon and carried about 36 kilometres above the surface of the Earth. 

One of those researchers is University of Toronto astronomy and astrophysics PhD student Jamil Shariff

Forensic science expert seeks justice for war crimes, protection of human rights

Sub-title: 
Meet Professor Michael Pollanen, president of the World Congress of the International Association of Forensic Sciences
Author: 
Heidi Singer

A ’forensic diplomat’ is one way to describe Michael Pollanen, the new president of the World Congress of the International Association of Forensic Sciences. The U of T professor is passionate about advancing forensic science to get justice for war crimes and protect human rights around the world. 

Transforming the education of health care professionals

Sub-title: 
"This is in some ways a golden moment," says George Thibault
Author: 
Jim Oldfield

Interprofessional teams are changing patient care in hospitals and health facilities around the world. Doctors, nurses, pharmacists, physician assistants, rehab specialists, social workers and other health professionals increasingly work together to deliver better care than specialists who work alone. 

The opposite of small beer: how lager conquered the world

Sub-title: 
“The thing with lager is that it’s relatively bland," says Professor Jeffrey Pilcher. "In many ways that blandness makes it the taste of modernity.”
Author: 
Don Campbell

Nearly every culture around the world can lay claim to having a fermented alcoholic beverage. 

From Mexican pulque to Peruvian chichi, or Indian palm toddy to African sorghum beer, the variety of taste, texture and aroma are as diverse as the societies that concocted them. With so much variety it’s surprising that a rather bland type of German beer, known popularly as lager, has overwhelmingly become the international drink of choice.

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