Engineering

Fostering a public passion for STEM

Sub-title: 
Molly Shoichet to lead U of T’s science and engineering engagement activities
Author: 
Althea Blackburn-Evans with files from Liz Do

Molly Shoichet, the world-renowned expert in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine, is the University of Toronto President Meric Gertler’s new senior advisor on science and engineering engagement. 

Shoichet, who says she has been fascinated by science since she was six years old, hopes to motivate the next generation to pursue science, technology, engineering and math. 

This is what a room of student startups competing for $42,000 in funding feels like

Sub-title: 
The Entrepreneurship Hatchery’s demo night hosted 13 teams competing for investment
Author: 
Brianna Goldberg

Aiming for more than $42,000 in prizes, the young University of Toronto entrepreneurs pitching to investors packed their presentations with 3D animations, live classical guitar serenades, product giveaways hidden under audience chairs – and one very efficient mop bucket.

Fall fashion tips from a personalized stylist in your pocket: Blynk, built by a U of T entrepreneur

Sub-title: 
Users swipe their way to new purchases as Blynk app gains industry steam
Author: 
Brianna Goldberg
According to Shums Kassam, a U of T engineering degree equips its students with many valuable things, but a solid fashion sense isn’t one of them.
 
“I wasn’t really into fashion, but after getting styled by a fashionable friend, my confidence increased and I found value in dressing and presenting myself better,” says the fourth-year engineering science student. “This was not something I learned from my engineering education.”
 

DIY robots, 3D printed chocolate and more: calling U of T entrepreneurs, students to join Toronto Maker Faire

Sub-title: 
In search of exhibitors and audiences for “The Greatest Show And Tell on Earth”
Author: 
Brianna Goldberg

For anyone who makes anything – from R2D2s to DIY skateboards to 3D-printed chocolate sculptures and beyond –  taking part in the Maker Faire means entering into a worldwide family-friendly carnival of wondrous, inventive physical stuff.

Launched as a showcase of cool inventions from California’s Bay area in 2006, satellite Maker Faires have since popped up around the globe in locations like Nairobi, Oslo and Rome, with a second annual instalment hosting thousands of ‘makers’ in Toronto on November 22 and 23.

Meet this year's Schulich Scholars

Author: 
Xarissa Thompson

Lukas Weese and Quinton Lowe have just arrived at the University of Toronto to start their first year -– recipients of the Schulich Leaders Scholarship, a prestigious award started by businessman and philanthropist Seymour Schulich. 

Supporting 40 students across Canada, the scholarship rewards students pursuing undergraduate degrees in STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) courses, who have also demonstrated significant leadership qualities.  

Students design innovative, low-cost solution for tricky tracheal intubation

Sub-title: 
Engineering alumnae use 3-D printing, household objects to create medical device
Author: 
Erin Vollick

A piece of string, a $1 spring and some 3D-printed plastic – it doesn’t sound like much. Yet, when brilliantly combined, these items can make a new tracheal intubation guide system for hard-to-intubate patients costing under $20.

Water: are we doing enough to conserve and protect this resource?

Sub-title: 
"One of the biggest challenges facing cities like Toronto is the uncertainty regarding water availability in the future"
Author: 
Dominic Ali

The University of Toronto is home to many experts who study how cities can be improved. One aspect of cities that may be taken for granted is one of the most important: water supply.

First intelligent, heated clothing burns up Indiegogo

Sub-title: 
Engineering alumni blast past crowdfunding goal of $20,000 in five days
Author: 
Marit Mitchell

Were you a little chilly last winter? So were Alex Huang and Jason Yakimovich. And they did something about it.

Then students slogging through bitter drifts to fourth-year classes, the two were so unimpressed by the polar vortex that they decided to take matters into their own hands by inventing the world's first intelligent heated base layer.

"That cold winter was the instigator," remembers Yakimovich. "We had the idea, and things got pretty serious pretty quickly."

Record number of Fellows of the Royal Society of Canada for U of T

Author: 
Jenny Hall

Twenty-one U of T scholars have been named Fellows of the Royal Society of Canada (RSC) this year, more than the university has ever seen inducted in a single year.

Using iPod apps to help diagnose, treat alcohol withdrawal

Author: 
Marit Mitchell

It’s a common scenario in emergency rooms across Canada: a patient suddenly stops regular, excessive alcohol consumption and develops withdrawal – a potentially fatal condition.

The most common clinical sign of withdrawal is tremor, especially in the hands and arms. But judging tremor severity is harder than it sounds; it requires considerable medical expertise and even experienced doctors’ estimates can vary widely.

Syndicate content