Engineering

Three health tech startups from U of T entrepreneurs making news

Sub-title: 
Bionym, Figure 1 and Quanttus see new funding, features, media coverage
Author: 
Brianna Goldberg

They’re building up, shipping out and being celebrated as the future of innovation.

U of T is a hub for many biotech and health innovators looking to develop their research and business acumen through programs, courses, accelerators and more.

Why this U of T biotech entrepreneur made MIT’s Innovators Under 35 list

Sub-title: 
Engineering alumnus David He tapped for work on covert startup, Quanttus
Author: 
Brianna Goldberg

David He finds himself in good company today: MIT Technology Review just named him to its list of Innovators Under 35.

It's a title the University of Toronto engineering alumnus shares with past honourees such as Larry Page and Sergey Brin (Google), Mark Zuckerberg (Facebook), Jack Dorsey (Twitter) and Jonathan Ive (designer of the iPod and iPad), to name a few.

So what market disrupting innovation has He produced to get added to this list of game-changers?

Lighting brighter: why Toronto is a world-class hub for energy efficient lighting

Sub-title: 
Major 'smart sustainable lighting’ conference to spark more collaborations
Author: 
Brianna Goldberg

Doing more with less is both the future of lighting and a trend that’s already flipped the switch in homes and businesses around the world, as 'smart sustainable' lighting like LEDs use less energy to shine brighter than ever before.

U of T scholars lead in prestigious graduate and post-doctoral research awards

Sub-title: 
Innovations range from injectable heart patches to HIV-battling chickenpox viruses
Author: 
Erin Vollick with files from Shujanaa Mahendrarajah

They’re trying to cure AIDS and cancer, improve teaching methods and mend damaged hearts. And they’ve just received some very prestigious support for their work.

The Government of Canada announced this year’s Vanier Canada Graduate Scholarships and Banting Postdoctoral Fellowships August 14 and the list includes 34 doctoral students and post-doctoral fellows from the University of Toronto − the most in the country. 

Lighting brighter: 6 ways smart sustainable lighting transforms cities, health, business and the environment

Sub-title: 
U of T’s entrepreneurs shine light on energy efficiency, reducing pollution and improving sleep
Author: 
Brianna Goldberg

Walk into a hardware store these days and you’ll find more varieties of light bulbs than ever before.

Some may look a bit strange and cost a bit more than the incandescent bulbs that used to be the norm. But these amazingly energy-efficient, “green” lighting solutions – and others still in development – are also helping to drastically change our homes, our cities and our world.

Malaysian Airlines Flight MH17: examining the evidence

Sub-title: 
What the experts can learn from human remains, aircraft debris
Author: 
Jelena Damjanovic

Nearly a week after the Malaysian Airlines flight MH17 was destroyed over Ukraine, questions abound over what exactly happened.

Writer Jelena Damjanovic spoke to professors Tracy Rogers and Doug Perovic about the procedures − and the challenges − of gathering scientific evidence and performing analysis to determine the causes of such tragedies.

This new dimming bulb doesn’t need a special light switch - and it’s still the world’s most energy efficient

Sub-title: 
U of T alumni startup Nanoleaf beat funding goal for new bulb in 90 minutes
Author: 
Brianna Goldberg

The U of T engineering alumni behind Nanoleaf, a startup which they say makes ‘the world’s most energy-efficient lightbulb,’ blasted well beyond their latest funding goal in under two hours.

Fuelling the excitement: the debut of their latest product: a new LED bulb design called Bloom, which “transforms” any on/off light switch into a dimmable switch with the team's innovative green technology.

Lab-on-chip technology developed by U of T brothers draws researchers from around the world

Sub-title: 
Dropbot created by grad students Ryan and Christian Fobel
Author: 
Sean Bettam

The opportunity to learn about a revolutionary technology that could significantly advance microfluidics research brought scientists from Brazil, England, Taiwan and elsewhere to Aaron Wheeler’s chemistry laboratory recently.

They came to learn how to use DropBot, a technology that bolsters microfluidics by adding a digital component.

Three big ideas from the opening of U of T’s new advanced materials lab

Author: 
Sydney Goodfellow and RJ Taylor

When three-time Indy 500 winner Hélio Castroneves speeds around the track at this month’s Indy races, he’ll be driving a racecar propelled by decades of materials research that makes it faster, safer and more efficient.

But with the opening of a new $20-million materials lab at the University of Toronto, the technology in Castroneves’ car could soon feel as old-fashioned as your grandma’s station wagon.

Understanding how wounds heal, helping those with chronic wounds heal faster

Sub-title: 
New research from IBBME
Author: 
Erin Vollick

You fall and scrape your knee. After cleaning the wound, you plaster a bandage over it and presto! In two to three days, your injury is nothing but a memory.

But what really just happened – how did your wound actually heal?

Using a student-designed software program called MEDUSA, a special type of microscope and a tool called fluorescent tagging, a group of researchers from the University of Toronto’s Institute of Biomaterials & Biomedical Engineering (IBBME) has been studying just that.

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