Engineering

Drone experts: U of T to train 150 grad students to fight forest fires, monitor crops, pipelines and railways with drones

Author: 
Tyler Irving

The word ‘drone’ often conjures up invasive images of military aircraft, but if Professor Hugh Liu of the University of Toronto Institute for Aerospace Studies has his way, that perception is about to change.

Liu has just received $1.65 million from the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC) to train 150 new experts in the use of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) for a variety of useful purposes, from agriculture to environmental monitoring.

Restoring eyesight and healing brains: how hydrogels can boost the work of stem cells

Sub-title: 
U of T researchers show that engineered hydrogels not only help with stem cell transplantation, but actually speed healing in both the eye and brain
Author: 
Jovana Drinjakovic

It's a discovery that, in early lab trials, has been shown to partially reverse blindness and help the brain recover from stroke.

Using a gel-like biomaterial called a hydrogel, University of Toronto scientists and engineers have made a breakthrough in cell transplantation that keeps cells alive and helps them integrate better into tissue.

From 3D printing for kids to spine surgery tools: U of T celebrates its top innovators

Author: 
Paul Fraumeni

The spirit of innovation and invention at U of T soared on May 7, when the University of Toronto paid tribute to researchers and students who have made their mark with a host of technologies and successful startup companies.

“The University of Toronto’s long history and acclaimed reputation as an institution is well known,” said President Meric Gertler to guests at U of T Celebrates Innovation. “Lesser known, I would suggest, is our role as a leading innovation and startup powerhouse.”

Research2Reality: understanding the ground-breaking work supported by your taxes

Sub-title: 
U of T science advisor launches national research advocacy program
Author: 
Paul Fraumeni

When University of Toronto physicist Dick Peltier began researching the interaction between the Earth’s land, atmosphere, water and biosphere, he created mathematical models depicting how climate evolved over 750 million years and how it will change in the future.

Cities of Learning: exploring public health, transit, food deserts, civic engagement and more

Sub-title: 
Symposium brings researchers from North and South America to tackle shared urban issues
Author: 
Noreen Ahmed-Ullah

As Canadian cities ponder ways to fix traffic gridlock, overcrowded transit systems or improve urban recreation, they often look to Europe and America for solutions.

But what about Latin America, which has seen booming socio-economic development over the last 15 years in countries such as Brazil and Argentina?

A two-day symposium at the University of Toronto May 11 - 12 aims to spur discussion on that topic and get university researchers and city thinkers looking beyond the typical go-to-models of Amsterdam or New York City.

Canada's largest paid internship program: what students and employers say about U of T engineering's PEY

Sub-title: 
Total amount earned by PEY students during 2014-2015: $40 million
Author: 
Tyler Irving

An invaluable new perspective came to engineering student Cassandra Rosen when she was deep in the heart of a nuclear power plant: “There’s something about getting to walk through it, seeing each part in action and how they relate to each other, that’s way more powerful than reading about it in a book.”

$20M opens high performance computing consortium to new research areas

Author: 
Paul Fraumeni

A $20 million investment from the federal government will enable the Southern Ontario Smart Computing Innovation Platform (SOSCIP) consortium to add new areas of focus – such as advanced manufacturing and cybersecurity – to its research projects.

U of T is a founding member of SOSCIP, created in 2012 to support collaboration between academic researchers and industries using advanced computing and big data analytics.  

The megacities that hog all the energy – and those that don't

Sub-title: 
Which mayors can sleep at night? Research reveals how world's biggest cities compare in the quest to conserve resources
Author: 
Tyler Irving

New York is an energy hog, London and Paris use relatively fewer resources and Tokyo conserves water like a pro.

These are just a few of the findings from a new study on “megacity metabolism” – the world’s first comprehensive survey of resources used and removed in each of the world’s 27 largest metropolitan areas.

Why did U of T name its entrepreneurship hub after Banting and Best?

Author: 
Brianna Goldberg

They saved lives here at home and around the world and they launched the first cohort of entrepreneurs at the University of Toronto – in 1923.

“Banting wasn’t an entrepreneur. Best wasn’t an entrepreneur. But the emergence of insulin really was an example of entrepreneurship at the University of Toronto,” says Michael Bliss, historian and author of The Discovery of Insulin.

Toronto 2015 Pan Am/Parapan Am Games: this PhD student is ranked sixth in the world for the 1000m

Sub-title: 
Engineering student Sasha Gollish hopes to compete at the Pan Am Games
Author: 
Valerie Iancovich

Sasha Gollish is not a superstitious person. But the Pan Am hopeful wasn’t feeling particularly inspired to run the 1000m on Friday the 13 at the Spire Invitational meet in February.

“I said to my coaches, Ross Ristuccia and Carl Georgevski, ‘I don’t feel well. I feel so heavy and slow.’”

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