Top Stories

U of T-designed microchip predicts donor lung viability

Sub-title: 
The smallest damage to a donor lung can be fatal to the recipient but a new microchip can reveal damaged tissue even at the molecular level
Author: 
Carolyn Morris

University of Toronto researchers have found a way to quickly determine if a donor lung is suitable for transplant by using a microchip to measure biomarkers – an innovation that could eliminate the leading cause of post-operation death.

Biomarker profiling can reveal damaged tissue at the molecular level. It’s being used in many other areas of medicine to identify disease and damage at very early stages, but up until now, these technologies have been too time-consuming to be used in the fast-paced world of donor organ assessment.

Citizen Lab: elaborate phishing attack targets Iranian diaspora, dissidents

Sub-title: 
Phone calls and online scams used in sophisticated attempt to bypass two-step authentification
Author: 
Irene Poetranto

It begins with a phone call from a UK phone number, with callers speaking in either English or Farsi.

But a new report from researchers at the University of Toronto's Citizen Lab says these calls are part of ongoing attacks against targets in Iran’s diaspora - and at least one Western activist. They're part of an attempt to bypass protections provided by what is known as “two-factor authentication” in Gmail.

Study of RCMP officers shows importance of empathy, good relationships at work

Sub-title: 
Peers and supervisors can reduce workplace anxiety, researchers say
Author: 
Don Campbell

Police officers deal with death, violent offenders, victims of abuse and devastating crime scenes – sometimes under intense public scrutiny or even suspicion.

It's a high-stress environment that can cause debilitating workplace anxiety, University of Toronto research shows. 

Urban grime discovery from University of Toronto captures world's attention

Sub-title: 
Chemistry's James Donaldson reveals that sunlight releases pollutants back into the atmosphere
Author: 
Terry Lavender

Much to his surprise, University of Toronto chemistry professor James Donaldson found himself a media star this month, thanks to urban grime.

Donaldson has been studying urban grime for over a decade. He recently presented research at the annual convention of the American Chemical Society detailing how sunlight triggers the release of smog-forming nitrogen oxide compounds from the dirt that builds up on buildings and statues in cities.

Previously it had been thought that these compounds remained “trapped” in the grime. 

Back to School 2015: Rhodes Scholars pay it forward

Sub-title: 
Boosting students' mentoring, networking and research opportunities at U of T
Author: 
Carolyn Morris

It’s the brainchild of Ayodele Odutayo, one of the University of Toronto’s Rhodes Scholars: a project that aims to support black, undergraduate med-school hopefuls by kick-starting their research skills and building their support networks.

And it’s a real-life example of an exceptional student paying it forward. 

Election 2015: when it comes to political ads, it's a mixed bag

Author: 
Alan Christie

All three main political parties could be doing a better job of getting their message out through television ads, David Soberman says.

University of Toronto one of top 25 universities in the world – again

Sub-title: 
Research and teaching strength leads to strong showing
Author: 
Terry Lavender

The University of Toronto has once again been rated one of the top 25 universities in the world and first in Canada in the distinguished Academic Ranking of World Universities (ARWU), produced annually by Shanghai Jiao Tong University.

U of T placed 25 overall and also placed highly in individual subject areas, including an 11th place ranking in computer science and 23rd in chemistry.

Like a ninja: N++ video game takes N to a whole new level (make that 2,360 levels)

Sub-title: 
Alumni spend 11 years perfecting game they call fast, fluid, frustrating, fun and even “friendship-ending”
Author: 
Scott Anderson

A project that began as an experiment when they were University of Toronto undergrads more than a decade ago has landed Mare Sheppard and Raigan Burns a worldwide distribution deal with Sony’s Playstation.

Sheppard and Burns are the creators of N++, a video game in which ninja players must avoid deadly traps and enemies, including an evil ninja twin, as they race to find an exit from each increasingly difficult screen. 

Will the Blue Jays make the playoffs? A statistics professor discusses the odds

Author: 
Jelena Damjanovic

After an impressive 11-game winning streak that thrilled longtime fans and attracted new ones, the Toronto Blue Jays faced the Yankees on August 14 with great expectations from the stands.

They lost the game but is it possible to predict how the rest of the season will go?. 

Can you tell a trustworthy from an untrustworthy face? The answer may surprise you

Sub-title: 
Research shows an inherent trustworthiness bias, which could mean the difference between life or death
Author: 
Veronica Zaretski

Can an apparent look of trustworthiness make the difference between life and death for convicted felons?

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