Top Stories

New program aims to improve care for children with life-threatening illnesses

Sub-title: 
Enhancing palliative and end-of-life care
Author: 
Dave Ross

Researchers at the University of Toronto and The Hospital for Sick Children (SickKids) hope to improve palliative and end-of-life care for children all across Canada, with a new program backed by the Canadian Partnership Against Cancer (CPAC).

Habitable planet discovery: alumna leads follow-up project seeking new worlds

Sub-title: 
MacArthur Fellow Sara Seager heads exoplanet research
Author: 
Brianna Goldberg

It’s a discovery bigger than world itself – literally. Astronomers reported evidence of the first potentially habitable Earth-sized planet, known as Kepler-186f, in a NASA study released April 17 and published in the journal, Science.

"The discovery of Kepler-186f is a significant step toward finding worlds like our planet Earth," said Paul Hertz, NASA's Astrophysics Division director at the agency's headquarters in Washington.

Earliest ancestor of land herbivores discovered

Sub-title: 
“Eocasea is one of the oldest relatives of modern mammals"

New research from the University of Toronto Mississauga demonstrates how carnivores transitioned into herbivores for the first time on land.

“The evolution of herbivory was revolutionary to life on land because it meant terrestrial vertebrates could directly access the vast resources provided by terrestrial plants,” says paleontologist Robert Reisz, a professor in the Department of Biology. “These herbivores in turn became a major food resource for large land predators.”

Most Canadians support screening newborns for specific genetic conditions, sequencing genomes

Author: 
Leslie Shepherd

Researchers say 94 per cent of Canadians surveyed said they would participate in public health programs that screen newborns for a specific number of genetic conditions.

And 80 per cent said they would be willing to participate in screening that would sequence their newborns’ genomes.

Re-thinking the use of adrenaline after a heart attack

Sub-title: 
Drug helps restore pulse but doesn't improve long-term survival rate, study finds
Author: 
Geoff Koehler

Giving patients adrenaline after they suffer a cardiac arrest outside of a hospital does not increase their prospects of surviving long-term, according to new research conducted at St. Michael’s Hospital.

Commonly prescribed drugs pose risks for seniors with emphysema

Sub-title: 
Respiratory problems for older COPD patients taking benzodiazepines
Author: 
Leslie Shepherd

A group of drugs commonly prescribed for insomnia, anxiety and breathing issues “significantly increase the risk” that older people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, or COPD, need to visit a doctor or emergency department for respiratory reasons, new research has found.

Concussion and teens: almost triple the risk of attempting suicide

Sub-title: 
Traumatic brain injury increases risk of depression, bullying and being bullied, study finds
Author: 
Leslie Shepherd

Teenagers who have suffered a traumatic brain injury such as a concussion are at “significantly greater odds” of attempting suicide, being bullied and engaging in a variety of high risk behaviours, a new study has found.

They are also more likely to become bullies themselves, to have sought counselling through a crisis help-line or to have been prescribed medication for anxiety, depression or both, said Assistant Professor Gabriela Ilie, lead author of the study and a post-doctoral fellow at St. Michael’s Hospital.

Brian Mulroney and Stephen Lewis on principled leadership in foreign affairs

Sub-title: 
Canada’s role in anti-apartheid struggle
Author: 
Michael Valpy

Canada needs more principled leadership in foreign affairs, former Prime Minister Brian Mulroney and former UN Ambassador Stephen Lewis told a symposium on Canada’s role in the struggle against apartheid held by Massey College and the Bill Graham Centre for Contemporary International History on April 10.

For the occasion, Mulroney and Lewis delivered a spell-binding exposition on how they defied the foreign affairs bureaucracy, Margaret Thatcher and the U.S. and British governments to give Canada a leadership role in the fight against South African apartheid.

Researchers raise doubt about morning sickness drug

Sub-title: 
Despite claims, commonly prescribed medication doesn't reduce birth defects, study finds
Author: 
Geoff Koehler

The most commonly prescribed drug for pregnant women suffering from morning sickness in their first trimester does not prevent birth defects even though drug safety data says it does, new research has found.

The Next Big Idea? Students, alumni, urban experts on improving our city

Author: 
Ennis Blentic

How do we narrow the divide between the suburbs and downtown? What role does transit play in making Toronto a first-class city? How do we effectively celebrate the rich cultural traditions of our immigrants? 

And are postwar, suburban towers part of the plan or just plain eye sores?

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